Migraine Headaches

DO YOU SUFFER FROM MIGRAINE HEADACHES?

ClinPoint Trials is seeking individuals who suffer from migraine headaches for a clinical research study. 

Throughout the course of the study, your health will be monitored by the study doctor and the study team. Qualified participants will receive study-related physical exams, lab tests, and investigational study medication at no cost.

Compensation may be provided for time and travel.

Please contact the ClinPoint Trials office at (972) 937-1640 to speak with a Study Coordinator for more information.

Winning the Battle Against Pre-Diabetes

By Marisa Sibley, CCRC

Originally published in the January/February 2018 Issue of Ellis County LIVING Magazine


“The greatest victory is that which requires no battle.” – Sun Tzu, The Art of War

I was introduced to Type 2 Diabetes as a young child. Not because I struggled with the condition, but because I had family members who did. I watched them take daily medication, check their blood sugar throughout the day, and eventually perform insulin injections before they would eat their meals. Unfortunately, all of these things were necessary to help manage their condition and help their bodies function properly.

In 2015, 30.3 million Americans, or 9.4% of the population, had diabetes. This is a number that has only continued to rise. However, what is perhaps even more staggering is the number of individuals with pre-diabetes (i.e. blood glucose levels higher than normal but not high enough to be diagnosed with diabetes). According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), approximately 86 million Americans age 20 and older (37% of the population) have pre-diabetes.

This equates to 1 out of every 3 people. Of this group, 90% don’t know they have it.

“Diabetes can lead to potentially serious health complications. Generally, the effects of high blood sugar are separated into vascular complications such as blocked arteries in the heart, legs, and brain leading to heart attack and strokes, as well as damage to the kidneys, nerves in the feet, and blindness. Individuals with pre-diabetes still have the opportunity to change the course of their health through prevention efforts.” – Dr. Thomas Ledbetter, Medical Director and Principal Investigator

Prevention of diabetes starts with understanding how our bodies function and how the condition develops. When we eat, our bodies break down the carbohydrates in our food into a sugar called glucose. Our pancreas releases a hormone called insulin, which acts as a key to let this glucose into our cells to use for energy to function. For individuals with pre-diabetes, the cells don’t respond normally to insulin. That is, the body develops a sort of resistance to insulin. In effect, the pancreas attempts to make more insulin to try to keep up with the amount of glucose in the blood and get the cells to respond to insulin’s message. Eventually the pancreas cannot keep up with the demand, leading to the amount of glucose in the blood to rise and setting the stage for Type 2 Diabetes down the road.

So what can we do to prevent developing diabetes?

  • Maintain a healthy weight. Research suggests that an overweight person losing 7% of their body weight can lower their risk of developing diabetes by 60%.
  • Engage in a physical activity you enjoy at least five days out of the week for 30 minutes per day.
  • Nourish your body by eating well and intuitively. Pay attention to your physical signal for hunger, eat slowly, and stop eating when you are full. Consider incorporating fiber-rich fruits and vegetables, whole grains and legumes, and lean proteins like chicken or fish into your meals.
  • Limit the intake of added sugars. The average adult needs 6-11 servings of carbohydrates per day according to the National Dietary Guidelines. Depending on your height and weight, activity level and gender, your intake needs may vary. A Registered Dietitian (RD) can help you assess your specific carbohydrate and other macronutrient needs.
  • Check your blood sugar and HbA1c, which is a value that reflects your blood glucose levels over an average of three months. This can be done with a simple blood test.

I am 25 years old. I want to believe that I have a long, healthy life ahead of me. This may be out of my control. For example, a contributing factor to the development of Type 2 Diabetes is genetics. Diabetes runs in my family, so I am certainly at risk. However, regardless of outcomes, I believe that my choices today matter. All of us, but especially my generation, have the opportunity to engage in an exciting victory against pre-diabetes, avoiding the battle all together through efforts of prevention, potentially changing the health of our population for generations to come.


ClinPoint Trials will be hosting free health screenings for adults, starting January 19th and 20th, 2018. Assessments will include, but are not limited to blood pressure, blood glucose, and HbA1c. Call (972) 937-1640 to schedule your free health screening today.

If you have been diagnosed with Type 2 Diabetes, you may qualify for a clinical research study. Call the ClinPoint Trials offices for more information about upcoming studies for Type 2 Diabetes.


Marisa is the Lead Clinical Research Coordinator at ClinPoint Trials, a clinical research site in Waxahachie. Learn more about ClinPoint and opportunities to participate in clinical trials at www.cptrials.com.

From the Lab to Your Medicine Cabinet

Understanding Clinical Trials and the Purpose in Participation

By: Marisa Sibley

Originally published in the May/June 2017 issue of Ellis County LIVING Magazine


When I was a child, I struggled with asthma. To help my condition, my doctor gave me an inhaler that contained a preventative asthma medication. It was easy to use and it helped make physical activities easier for me. I was able to play my favorite sports without fearing I wouldn't be able to breathe. This helped give me a better quality of life as a child. I no longer struggle with asthma, but I am thankful that there was a treatment available to help my condition. 

For me it was an asthma medication and in inhaler. For some it may be insulin or a blood sugar monitor. For others it may simply be an over the counter medication for a common cold or a headache. 

All medications of medical devices available for use by the general population are so only because of individuals who were first willing to volunteer to participate in clinical trials. 

Clinical trials are research studies that seek to answer questions about medical treatments, medical devices or medical strategies. All medical treatments and devices start as ideas. Those ideas are then developed and tested in the laboratory. If the research on these new developments is promising and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approves further research testing, then the idea may move forward into clinical trials with human volunteers. 

All potential treatments and devices are tested first in Phase 1 trials, which will only assess whether or not the products are safe for human use. If the products show to be generally safe, then the treatments or devices will continue into Phase 2 and 3 trials with larger numbers of volunteers. These trials continue to answer questions about safety, but also begin to assess how well a product works to improve patient outcomes, if it will benefit a patient, or if the product causes unexpected harm. The FDA monitors and reviews the research data on investigational treatments and devices very closely during all phases of clinical trials and can stop the trials at any time. 

After all trials are completed, the FDA may or may not decide to approve a new treatment or device. Only after FDA approval will these ideas turned treatments end up in our medicine cabinets. Research then continues on these treatments or devices after they enter the marketplace. 

There are many reasons why people choose to participate in clinical trials The top reasons include to advance medicine, to help improve the lives of others, to help improve their own medical condition or to supplement their own standard health care. 

If you choose to join a clinical trial, you can expect to first be thoroughly informed about the study, what the study is testing, information about study appointments and procedures, potential risks and benefits, and your role as a participant.The study doctor, also called an Investigator, will assess whether or not you would be eligible to participate in the study. your eligibility may depend on your medical history, medications you are taking, or other diagnostic tests or exams. 

Throughout the course of your participation in a trial, you can expect your health to be monitored very closely by the Investigator and the study team. This is done through a series of visits to the clinical research site before, during and after a study treatment or device is received or used. Since you are a volunteer, your study-related care is provided free of charge. You may also receive compensation for your time and travel. 

Had no one ever participated in clinical trials for asthma, I may not have had access to a medication that helped my condition improve as a child. Clinical trials are the gateway to advancing medical knowledge and patient care for generations to come. Whether you are a healthy person or have a chronic medical condition, you can help to move medicine forward through participation in a clinical trial. It is truly a gift that keeps on giving. 

If you are interested in participating in a clinical trial in the future or would like more information, reach out to your local clinical research site to speak with a member of the study team about how you can get involved. 


Marisa is a Certified Clinical Research Coordinator (CCRC) at ClinPoint Trials, a clinical research site in Waxahachie. Learn more at www.cptrials.com. You can reach her at (972) 937-1640 or marisas@cptrials.com for more information.

Osteoarthritis of the Hip or Knee (Closed)

This study is now enrolling participants. More information coming soon. If you would like to see if you qualify to participate in this study, please click the button below to contact us or call our Study Coordinator at (972) 937-1640.

Type 2 Diabetes (Closed)

ClinPoint Trials is seeking adults who have been diagnosed with Type 2 Diabetes for a clinical research study. 

You may be eligible for this study if you are currently taking Metformin. 

Throughout the course of the study, your health will be monitored by the study team and the study doctor. Qualified participants will receive study-related physical exams, lab tests, and investigational study medication or placebo at no cost.

Compensation may be provided for time and travel.

Contact us at (972) 937-1640 for more information.

Migraine Headaches (Closed)

Do you get migraines?

ClinPoint Trials is seeking individuals who get migraine headaches for a clinical research study. 

You may be eligible for this study if you are between the ages of 18 to 75 and have been diagnosed with migraine headaches for at least one year. 

Throughout the course of the study, your health will be monitored by the study team and the study doctor. Qualified participants will receive study-related physical exams, lab tests, and investigational study medication at no cost.

Compensation may be provided for time and travel.

Contact us at (972) 937-1640 for more information.